Peoples Climate March reactions

For the second weekend in a row, scientists and their allies marched to show their support for science.

The Peoples Climate March had the largest presence in Washington, D.C., with crowds estimated to top 200,000, but hundreds of other sister marches happened around the country and the world. For many, marching was the culmination of months of planning--for others, it was a last minute choice: "Several demonstrators said they were inspired to march by new reports that the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) removed references to climate change from its website late Friday night," wrote Chelsea Bailey for NBC News.

Politics was, of course, inescapable... many signs chastised the Trump administration for turning its back on science. "The demonstrators’ list of grievances was long," wrote Nicholas Fandos for The New York Times. "Since taking office, Mr. Trump has appointed one of the chief antagonists of the Environmental Protection Agency, Scott Pruitt, as its administrator and proposed slashing its budget by nearly a third, more than any other federal agency. He has signed several executive orders aimed at rolling back President Barack Obama’s Clean Power Plan, a set of regulations intended to close heavily polluting coal-fired power plants, and restrictions on vehicle emissions, among others."

Right wing outlets like Breitbart tried to shift the conversation to the multi-million dollar donations of George Soros to the various organizations involved, but those on the ground surely were more busy with their chants... or just trying to keep cool. Most fittingly of all for a climate march, temperatures in D.C. rocketed to nearly record highs.

Braving the baking sun was MOBProd contributor Dr. Geoffrey Supran. He filed this report from the front lines of the Peoples Climate March in D.C.

Producer/editor: Fedor Kossakovski

Camera: Ploy Achakulwisut